Eggshell Planters

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Eggshell Planters

Spring has sprung, and it’s time to get those seeds started for your garden. Did you know you can use leftover eggshells as planters? The best part is they can be put right in the soil when the seedlings are established – no transplanting needed!

Here’s how to start your seeds in eggshells:

1.) Save your eggshells from your next meal. Carefully crack the top third of the egg. Rinse them out so they don’t become smelly or sticky. If you are concerned about salmonella on the eggshells, simply place the empty eggshells in a pot of boiling water for a few minutes.

2.) Take the empty eggshell and poke a small hole in the bottom of the shell. A thin needle or pin works great. This hole will provide drainage so the roots of your plant don’t drown.

3.) Using a small spoon, add soil to each eggshell. Be sure to use a seed starting soil – this is a lighter soil that allows the root system to grow freely through the plant, creating a strong, healthy plant.

4.) Add the seeds to the soil. Slightly push down just until the seeds are fully covered. Make sure you don’t push them too deep as it will take longer for your seedlings to germinate.

5.) Water your seeds. Keep the soil moist, but not soaked.

6.) After you’ve planted the seeds, you can put the eggshell planters back into the egg carton. The carton will provide a stable base with room for drainage.

7.) Put them in a sunny area in your home and enjoy watching them grow!

Ready to plant your seedlings? Simply place the entire plant, eggshell and all, into the soil.

Benefits of using eggshells:

— Fertilizing: Eggshells are a great source of calcium and other minerals, making them the perfect compost for your garden.

— Pest Control: Slugs, snails and even deer dislike eggshells making them a great choice to protect your garden from unwanted creatures.

— Food for indoor plants: Simply add clean, crushed eggshells to filtered water and leave in a cool, dark place for several days. You now have homemade plant food for your indoor plants.

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